Monthly Archives: September 2017

marketing

Is Traditional Marketing Still Relevant?

We often spend a lot of time looking towards the future, addressing new trends, new technology and new research. However, does traditional marketing still have a place within these modern business strategies?

Is traditional marketing still relevant?

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The answer, in simple terms, is yes. No matter what brilliant results can be achieved through social media, viral marketing or stealth advertising, there is still a very important place carved out for the more traditional forms of marketing. While it is an important method of reaching people, online is not the only way. Potential customers still watch television and are receptive to the messages in commercials. They still read newspapers, and will be intrigued by the advertisements – especially if they’re being offered some kind of great incentive.

Additionally, people still drive past billboards and will notice the messaging being conveyed, and they’ll still listen to the radio in the car and hear advertisements. None of this has changed through the advent of online. Traditional messaging is accessible to all, no matter whether they’re online or not. This can be particularly beneficial if you’re looking to target an older generation who aren’t always as internet savvy as a millennial audience. Likewise, traditional marketing can help you target a specific audience in a geographic area, and remains credible in a time of fake news. Traditional media outlets are seen as trusted sources.

Do we still need marketing collateral?

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Likewise, marketing collateral remains an important strategy. Sending leaflets and letters through the door is still a great way of getting your message across in a direct and targeted way. The same goes for any collateral that is being given away at events and exhibitions, including promotional merchandise. Huff Post have found that 83% of consumers actually like to receive a promotional product that has an advertising message on it, while 85% of customers will go on to do business with the advertiser once they have received the promo product.

Unlike an e-mail, which has a fleeting lifespan, with a promotional product, over half of recipients will keep hold of the item from anywhere between one year and four years. There’s a lot to be said for the value that this merchandise holds. In addition to all this, by combining a traditional method, such as promotional merchandise, with modern methods, such as online marketing, it has been found that the promo product increases the effectiveness of other strategies and media. Ultimately, through combining new and old together, it’s possible to find greater success.

What is the future of traditional marketing tactics?

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It is worth noting, though, that the modern audience is becoming increasingly more judicious as they find themselves dealing with advertising and marketing at every turn. Therefore, personalised communications are proving most effective. Showing an awareness of the audience or appreciating details about their life can all help traditional marketing tactics thrive in the future of the digital world.

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Interactive marketing – what is it and why it matters?

Marketing is a constantly changing field; it plays a key role in raising brand awareness, generating new sales leads, building customer loyalty, and creating a company communications strategy both on and offline. One new trend in this field is interactive marketing, which is changing the way consumers engage with businesses.



lead_pho Thanks to social media, which has created much more intimacy and connection between brands and customers, there is now a greater expectation upon how much engagement should be available. Interactive marketing is another way of developing this, and is about responding to something that a customer specifically does, rather than taking a vague and blanket approach. It’s sometimes referred to as ‘trigger-based’ or ‘event-based’ marketing. The action is led by the consumer, who starts this chain of events off.

An example of interactive marketing can be seen when you go to a fast food chain and order a hamburger. This will be followed with another question, such as “Would you like fries with that?”, It sees the purchase of one product trigger another purchase.

lead_phoThis can again be seen on sites such as Amazon, when you put an item in your basket and the website generates a list of other possible buys with the headline “Customers who picked this, also bought…”. This relies on collecting and digesting visitor behaviour, and using clever algorithms and technology to show meaningful information to the customer. This may also see the site recommending products that relate to something you looked at months earlier, or placed an order for previously.

Interactive marketing is much more personal and tailored than other types, and therefore can help to drive up sales results and increase conversion rates. It can additionally play a key role in improving the overall customer experience. In putting the best suggestions or opportunities to your customers at all times, you are showing them that you have been paying attention to what they’ve been doing, ordering, and what they’re interested in. It builds engagement and brand loyalty, and makes for a more pleasant experience.

lead_phoIt doesn’t have to be time intensive on your part – no one at Amazon sits around watching your movements on the site, making manual suggestions. It is all tracked by computers.

Interactive marketing can be as straightforward as all other types of marketing, such as promotional merchandise. It can also lower marketing costs, because happy customers will naturally refer you and keep coming back for more. They will enjoy the personal experience. It can also increase sales, increase customer satisfaction, and build a clear sense of branding.

However, interactive marketing should come as part of a wider strategy, rather than being the only type relied on. Promotional products, for example, help to spread brand awareness with new customers that may not have heard of you before. Once they’re directed to your business or site, this is where interactive marketing can kick in. It also helps in recognising that not everyone is alike, and people need to be targeted in a number of different ways.

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A day in the life of our jet-setter, Lauren Alexander…

Hi, I’m Lauren and I have worked at Creative Emporium for nearly 6 years now. Yorkshire lass born and bred, I live in Saltaire with my fiancé Dominic.

My role has changed a lot since I started! Starting out as an Account Manager, I worked with great clients like Deloitte and the University of Manchester. I later moved into my current role as Client Services Manager, responsible for training all our CE sales staff on customer service processes, to make sure everything runs as smoothly and effortlessly as possible. I work to improve the service we offer clients by managing projects that focus on client interaction.

I also act as HR Manager across the group, fulfilling the need for the recruitment, induction and training of new staff.

My favourite part of my role is meeting all the new recruits that enter the business! Introducing them and helping to get them settled into their new roles. The business is fast paced and that means I’m always looking at new opportunities and working on new projects. I do this alongside our Account Managers and Executives, ensuring our team develops and we offer the best service possible.

I love planning and going on holidays! I went with a group of friends this year for a joint 30th celebration in Las Vegas and San Francisco. I’m also recently engaged and taking on the mammoth task of planning a wedding. I’m surrounded by Pinterest boards!

If I’m not planning holidays or my wedding, I’ll be exploring the new bars and restaurants that pop up around Leeds, it’s a great place to be at the moment. I also love a good crime drama or detective novel, but who doesn’t like a whodunnit?

For our next ‘day in the life..’ blog, I nominate Dave Lister, our systems and CO3 expert, in addition to self-confessed coffee snob!

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Dark Social – why you can’t ignore it…

Since 2012 the phrase ‘dark social’ has been mentioned with increasing frequency amongst many marketing circles. It sounds like something you might expect to hear about in a Batman movie, but it’s actually all to do with your traffic, referrals and how you are able to track it.


lead_phoTypically businesses will have many different analytical softwares in place to help them see where people are coming from, how they’re finding out about your company, and who they’re sharing it with. This includes Google Analytics, which provides a very detailed account for users of their website and the impact social media can have.

However, dark social is a concept that Alexis C. Madrigal, senior editor at The Atlantic, introduced to refer to content that is shared in ways that cannot be measured by web analytics programs. So how does this work in reality?

augmented-reality-1853592_1920Essentially, you may see an article about the value of promotional merchandise or a list of the top 5 promotional products your company needs. A journey would have occurred for you to find this, which would be possible to track. For example, you may have googled a specific search term, or seen the link on social media.

If you were to cut and paste the link to this article or product listing and send it to someone in a messenger services, such as e-mail, SnapChat or Whatsapp, then you have just engaged in dark social. To the person whose link you’ve shared, you will look as though you are direct traffic, even though a referral process took place behind the scenes. Without recognising the impact of dark social, brands can be misled into thinking they’re getting more direct traffic than they actually are.

lead_pho The article or listing you have shared in a one-on-one capacity rather than through social media means there is traffic coming to your site that you can’t always effectively measure. It is thought by Radiumone that dark social accounts for 84% of consumer sharing. Much more is taking place in private, even though 90% of social marketing ad budgets – on average – is spent on social networks. Dark social typically occurs on mobile devices, with 62% of clickbacks happening this way.

It’s important for businesses to consider the impact of dark social when looking at their social media marketing strategies, and implementing trackable sources for analytical purposes. Dark social is, as the name suggests, a lot more about being social and shows an awareness in customers of just how much technology tracks movements. Recognising this social part of the web and how customers are communicating with each other can ensure your brand or links are getting shared more frequently, and with greater success.


 


 

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